WHY? WHY NOT?

Sometimes all you need is 20 inches of literally INSANE COURAGE

and  EMBARRASSING BRAVERY.

—Why Girl promises something great will come of it.

mphprogramslist.com

mphprogramslist.com

 

Copyright WhyGirl.com; Webmaster—Regina Cleveland; Graphic Artist—Mel Dominquez

 

 

 

 

“Doctor Who” 50th Anniversary Celebration? Why Not?

The big “Doctor Who” 50th anniversary celebration will happen worldwide!

by patrick kevin day, (paraphrased by Robin Henning)

the big dr. who 50th anniv
celebration will happen worldwide
at the same time, but in case it comes at an inconvenient
time, a second night has been added.
doctor who: the day of the doctor ‘  will screen
silmultaneously on TV in more than 75 countries
on 11/23 as well as in select movie theatres.  Add’l
theater screenings will follow on 11/25.
the extra theat. scr.s, which will take place in300
theaters in LA and elsewhere across the country
will feature the special ‘dr. who’ adventure in REALD3D,
giving an
added incentive to get off the couch and out of the house.
the anniv. hoopla, which commemorates the BBC
creation as the lognest running sci-fi show on tv is also
a celebration of Matt Smith, whose tenure as the 11th Doctor
will be coming to an end this year with the Christmas special,
a month after “Day of the Doctor.”  He’ll be replaced by Peter
Capaldi, best known from his work on the comedy series
“The Thick of It.”
Why Girls lab, "The Doctor"

Why Girls lab, “The Doctor”

Copyright WhyGirl.com; Webmaster—Regina Cleveland; Graphic Artist—Mel Dominquez

 

Bodhisattva, Would you take me by the hand?

In Buddhism, a bodhisattva (Sanskritbodhisattva) is enlightenment (bodhi) being (sattva). Traditionally, a bodhisattva is anyone who, motivated by great compassion, has generated bodhicitta, which is a spontaneous wish to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings.

 

Lyrics from the song BODHISATTVA by Steely Dan—Countdown to Ecstasy.

Bodhisattva

Would you take me by the hand

Bodhisattva

Would you take me by the hand

Can you show me

The shine of your Japan

The sparkle of your china

Can you show me Bodhisattva

Bodhisattva
 I’m gonna sell my house in town

Bodhisattva
 I’m gonna sell my house in town

And I’ll be there

To shine in your Japan

To sparkle in your China

Yes I’ll be there
 Bodhisattva

 

Steely Dan

Steely Dan

Copyright WhyGirl.com; Webmaster—Regina Cleveland; Graphic Artist—Mel Dominquez

 

 

Why would anyone be so CHEAP in serving up a “Wake”?

Last post, Why Girl talked about the legendary celebration of the ancestors—festivals, abundance of food, good thoughts and lively dancing.
Why Girl was shocked when she heard from a distant relative that dished up a paltry “Wake” for his “beloved” wife, after “Day of the Dead.”  Costco Pizza was the food of choice.  Is that what he thought suitable for his wife of 30 years, Pizza?  Neighbors attended, but they didn’t really know them?  This is the craziest account of a funeral service Why Girl has ever heard.
Husband Doug reports,
“The service was held November 3 @ 11am.  It was a wonderful service.  Each family member: Pat’s 2 daughters:PJ & Deanna Marks and one son David Marks and Deanna’s 2 sons(Pat’s grandsons) Keegan Black and Riley Black and myself gave a tearful and emotional eulogy.  We all loved her very much and will miss her.  We had a good send off.  I was surprised at the number of neighbors(about 12) that attended, even though we weren’t that social with them, they still came to pay their respects.  After the service we had Costco pizza at our house and several neighbors stopped by.  Thank You for your condolences.”
Why Girl screamed, “Give me champagne and caviar for my “Wake” or I’ll come back and haunt you.  You’d better make the champagne Veuve-Clicquot according to the good book, “Absolutely Fabulous.”   http://www.veuve-clicquot.com
the-humorist

Copyright WhyGirl.com; Webmaster—Regina Cleveland; Graphic Artist—Mel Dominquez

Why “Day of the Dead”? Why celebrate our ancestors?

Mel Dominguez

Mel Dominguez

It’s important to celebrate our ancestors.  We “white people” can learn a lot from our Mexican, Japanese, and Native American friends about celebrating the dead.

Day of the Dead celebrations alive and well

Day of the Dead, November 2, 2013

Why Girl has been told by her Mexican friends, “Death is something good, not bad. We say death is like waking up, we are not afraid of death, we embrace it.”

How to celebrate the Day of the Dead:

Build an altar. Decorate with candles, blowers, a framed picture of your dead loved one. Add reminders of your loved one and put out food and drink he or she liked. Tell stories about the loved one around the altar and have young family members introduce themselves. Leave out salt. Burn an incense known as copal.

Visit the graves of your loved ones. Clean and decorate with trinkets, flowers and candies. Bring toys for children. Alcohol is a common offering for adults.

Set out pillows and blankets at home. The belief is the dead can rest after their journey to be with you.

Make food offerings. Leave out favorite foods in your home. It’s believed that the dead will eat the “spiritual essence.” You can eat what remains. Sugar skulls and special bread are part of the setting.

Prepare a special dinner. A plate is set for every person whose memory you honor. Include favorite dishes of the dead. Tamales, Jarritos-brand soda and Lola, a drinkable yogurt, are popular with Mexican-Americans.

Welcome the dead and celebrate. Eat, dance, tell stories about the departed — and have fun.

Why Girl danced in the Obon Festival for the first time on July 13, 2013.  An exhilarating exprience.

Obon (お盆?) or just Bon (盆?) is a Japanese Buddhist custom to honor the spirits of one’s ancestors. This Buddhist custom has evolved into a family reunion holiday during which people return to ancestral family places and visit and clean their ancestors’ graves, and when the spirits of ancestors are supposed to revisit the household altars. It has been celebrated in Japan for more than 500 years and traditionally includes a dance, known as Bon-Odori.  In America, Obon or ‘Festival of the Dead’  is a celebration of the rich Japanese-American cultural heritage. Obon features bon odori folk dancing, live music and taiko, games, and lots of food.

Why Girl has friends, jewelry makers, who live in the Santo Domingo Pueblo, New Mexico.  They celebrate the return of their ancestors by preparing a special feast for them.  They make their favorite food.  And in the old way, a plate for each ancestor is served on the floor of their pueblo homes.

Ancient Pueblo peoples or Ancestral Pueblo peoples were an ancient Native American culture centered on the present-day Four Corners of the US—Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico.  They lived in a range of structures, including pit houses, pueblos, and cliff dwellings designed so that they could lift entry ladders during enemy attacks, which provided security. Archaeologists referred these cultural groups as the Anasazi—the original people.

 

Copyright WhyGirl.com; Webmaster—Regina Cleveland; Graphic Artist—Mel Dominquez